What’s New in the Editor: More Design Tools, Enhanced Lists, Easier Block Switching

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 29-09-2022

Ever since the block editor was introduced in 2018, we’ve been pushing it to do more — and our latest crop of improvements will help you build posts and pages on your site with confidence, no matter what you publish:

  • More design tools for dozens of blocks
  • More control over lists with our improved List Block
  • Easier block-switching

Let’s take a closer look at each.

More Design Tools for Dozens of Blocks

We’ve added a variety of design tools to dozens of blocks. Depending on the block, you’ll now see typography, color, border, spacing, and layout options. 

To play around with these new design tools, select the block you want to work with and use the right-hand sidebar to access these sections. 

You’ll see a few controls right away, but with just a couple clicks you can go even deeper. Select the three dots on the upper right of each section to find even more options, or hit the red chain link button to allow control over borders and/or padding for each side or corner individually. 


Without a doubt, one of the most fun additions is having more border options on Image Blocks:

More Control Over Lists 

Our improved List Block means that lists are easier to manage from the toolbar. Every item and hierarchy in your list can now be manipulated as its own block. Rearranging, grouping, and nesting items has never been easier: 

Easier Block-Switching

The block transforms menu offers a quick shortcut to switch to a different block, depending on your content. As the number of blocks has grown and you’ve started using this menu more and more, it’s been made more useful by changing the organization of what’s displayed at the top. For blocks that support paragraph, heading, list, and quote transformations — which are, by far, the most used changes — we’ve now emphasized those blocks: 

Keep building with the block editor. We’ll keep improving it.

The block editor is always growing and improving as a result of your feedback, so thank you — we can’t wait to show you what we’re building next. In the meantime, we’ll continue working hard behind the scenes, with more updates to come! Have ideas for how to improve the editor? Let us know in the comments. 

WordPress 6.1 Beta 2 Now Available

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 27-09-2022

WordPress 6.1 Beta 2 is now available for download and testing.

This version of the WordPress software is under development. Please do not install, run, or test this version of WordPress on production or mission-critical websites. Instead, it is recommended that you test Beta 2 on a test server and site. 

You can test WordPress 6.1 Beta 2 in three ways:

Option 1: Install and activate the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (select the “Bleeding edge” channel and “Beta/RC Only” stream).

Option 2: Direct download the Beta 2 version (zip).

Option 3: Use the following WP-CLI command:

wp core update --version=6.1-beta2

The current target for the final release is November 1, 2022, which is about five weeks away. 

Additional information on the 6.1 release cycle is available.

Check the Make WordPress Core blog for 6.1-related developer notes in the coming weeks detailing all upcoming changes.

Keep WordPress bug-free – help with testing

Testing for issues is critical for stabilizing a release throughout its development. Testing is also a great way to contribute. This detailed guide is an excellent start if you have never tested a beta release before.

Testing helps ensure that this and future releases of WordPress are as stable and issue-free as possible. Anyone can take part in testing – especially great WordPress community members like you.

Want to know more about testing releases like this one? Read about the testing initiatives that happen in Make Core. You can also join a core-test channel on the Making WordPress Slack workspace.

If you have run into an issue, please report it to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. If you are comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, you can file one on WordPress Trac. This is also where you can find a list of known bugs.

To review features in the Gutenberg releases since WordPress 6.0 (the most recent major release of WordPress), access the What’s New In Gutenberg posts for 14.1, 14.0, 13.9, 13.8, 13.7, 13.6, 13.5, 13.4, 13.3, 13.2, and 13.1.

This release contains more than 350 enhancements and 350 bug fixes for the editor, including more than 250 tickets for the WordPress 6.1 core. More fixes are on the way.

Some highlights

Want to know what’s new in version 6.1? Read the initial Beta 1 announcement for some details, or check out the product walk-through recording.

What’s new in Beta 2

Here are some updates since last week’s Beta 1 release:


A haiku for beta 2

WordPress six-point-one
Global collaboration
Gutenberg phase two


Thank you to the following contributors for collaborating on this post: @dansoschin, @robinwpdeveloper, and @webcommsat

WordPress 6.1 Beta 1 Now Available

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 21-09-2022

WordPress 6.1 Beta 1 is now available for download and testing.

This version of the WordPress software is under development. Please do not install, run, or test this version of WordPress on production or mission-critical websites. Instead, it is recommended that you test Beta 1 on a test server and site. 


You can test WordPress 6.1 Beta 1 in three ways:

Option 1: Install and activate the WordPress Beta Tester plugin (select the “Bleeding edge” channel and “Beta/RC Only” stream).

Option 2: Direct download the Beta 1 version (zip).

Option 3: Use the following WP-CLI command:

wp core update --version=6.1-beta1

The current target for the final release is November 1, 2022, which is about six weeks away. 

Additional information on the 6.1 release cycle is available.

Check the Make WordPress Core blog for 6.1-related developer notes in the coming weeks detailing all upcoming changes.

Keep WordPress bug-free – help with testing

Testing for issues is critical for stabilizing a release throughout its development. Testing is also a great way to contribute. If you have never tested a beta release before, this detailed guide is a great start.

Testing helps make sure that this and future releases of WordPress are as stable and issue-free as possible. Anyone can do it – especially great WordPress community members like you.

Want to know more about testing releases like this one? Read about the testing initiatives that happen in Make Core. You can also join a publicly-accessible channel on the Making WordPress Slack workspace.

If you think you have run into an issue, please report it to the Alpha/Beta area in the support forums. If you are comfortable writing a reproducible bug report, you can file one on WordPress Trac. This is also where you can find a list of known bugs.

To review features in the Gutenberg releases since WordPress 6.0 (the most recent major release of WordPress), access the What’s New In Gutenberg posts for 14.1, 14.0, 13.9, 13.8, 13.7, 13.6, 13.5, 13.4, 13.3, 13.2, and 13.1.

This release contains more than 350 enhancements and 350 bug fixes for the editor, including more than 250 tickets for the WordPress 6.1 core.

Some highlights

Want to know what’s new in WordPress version 6.1? Read on for some highlights.

Features for end-users

  • Default theme powered by 10 unique style variations (learn more)
  • More design tools in more blocks (learn more)
  • Expanded and refined template experience and template options
  • More intuitive document settings experience
  • Header and footer patterns for all themes
  • Improved quote and list blocks with inner block support
  • More robust placeholders for various blocks
  • New modal interfaces and preferences improvements
  • Automatic navigation block selection with fallbacks and easier menu management
  • Apply locking settings to all inner blocks in one click
  • Improvements to the block theme discovery experience
  • Accessibility updates, with more than 60 resolved tickets
  • Performance updates, with more than 25 resolved tickets

For developers

  • Opt into appearance tools to make any theme more powerful
  • New iteration on the style system
  • Add starter patterns to any post type (learn more)
  • Evolution of layout options including a new constrained option and the ability to disable layout options
  • Content lock patterns for more curation options
  • Expanded support for query loop blocks
  • Allow the use of block-based template parts in classic themes (give feedback)
  • Filter theme.json data (learn more)
  • Fluid typography allows for more responsiveness (give feedback)
  • Ability to style elements inside blocks like buttons, headings, or captions in theme.json

Please note that all features listed in this post are subject to change before the final release.


A Haiku for you

Twenty Twenty-Three
10 style variations
The new default theme


Thank you to the following contributors for collaborating on this post: @dansoschin, @annezazu, @cbringmann, @davidbaumwald, @priethor, and @jeffpaul.

WP Briefing: Episode 39: Contributor Stories Live from WordCamp US!

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 19-09-2022

In the thirty-ninth episode of the WordPress Briefing, hear contributors at WordCamp US share stories about their why for using WordPress and attending WordCamps.

Have a question you’d like answered? You can submit them to wpbriefing@wordpress.org, either written or as a voice recording.

Credits

Editor: Dustin Hartzler
Logo: Javier Arce
Production: Santana Inniss and Chloé Bringmann
Song: Fearless First by Kevin MacLeod

Guests

Topher DeRosia
Jen Miller
Courtney Robertson
Kathy Drewien
Alex Stine
Courtney Patubo Kranzke
Dustin Hartzler
Ricardas Kudirka

References

WordPress Translation Day September 28, 2022
WooSesh October 11-13, 2022
All Things Open October 30-November 2, 2022

Transcript

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:00:00] 

Hello, everyone! And welcome to the WordPress Briefing, the podcast where you can catch quick explanations of some of the ideas behind the WordPress open source project and the community around it, as well as get a small list of big things coming up in the next two weeks. I’m your host, Josepha Haden Chomphosy. 

Here we go!

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:00:41] 

For folks who are new to WordPress in the past couple of years, you may have heard people talk about WordPress events with a sort of passion that really is hard to describe. For me, I know our events are the dark matter of what makes this global, fully distributed, multifaceted project come together so well in the end.

But I also know that WordPressers have so many different reasons for coming together. So we took a little wander through WordCamp US to get their take on why they use WordPress and also why they go to WordCamps.

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:01:13] 

So WordCamp US is back in person for the first time since 2019. What are you most excited about?

[Topher 00:01:19] 

I am Topher.

Seeing everyone, the interpersonal relationships, the communication, the expressions on people’s faces that you don’t get via email or Slack or whatever. Just being near people again and enjoying each other’s company.

[Jen Miller 00:01:35] 

My name is Jen Miller.

I was most excited to see my friends. It’s been a long time to try to maintain connections via social media and, you know, texting and phone calls. But being here and being a part of the WordPress community has made everything great.

[Courtney Robertson 00:01:54] 

Courtney Robertson.

Contributor day, of course, that’s how I got really connected to the WordPress community. And I am hoping we have a great turnout.

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:02:02] 

How long have you been a contributor to WordPress?

[Kathy Drewien 00:02:05] 

Hi, I’m Kathy Drewien.

I started in 2008 by attending my first WordCamp. Two years later, I was part of the organizing team for WordCamp Atlanta. I have been on that team for one role or another. Well, I can’t tell you how many years now. From then, until now.

[Alex Stine 00:02:24] 

My name is Alex Stine. About six years now.

[Topher 00:02:28] 

About 12 years.

I started going to WordCamp, then working in the support forums, and just grew from there.

[Courtney Robertson 00:02:24] 

I started checking guests in, at my first WordCamp in 2009, which I see as one avenue of contributing. I joined a team officially in 2014. 

[Courtney Patubo Kranzke 00:02:47] 

My name is Courtney Patubo Kranzke.

I have been an on-and-off contributor to WordPress since like the mid-2000s, but I’ve been a sponsored contributor since 2016.

[Dustin Hartzler 00:03:02] 

My name is Dustin Hartzler.

I started a WordPress podcast in 2010. And I did like 500 episodes in a row without a break and without a week worth of rest. So I consider that my contribution to WordPress. I have a couple of core contributions, like I, I fixed a little bug here, a little bug there in a couple of releases, I think back in the four eras, 4.1 or 4.2 or something.

2010 is when I really got started in giving back, and, like, sharing my knowledge with the WordPress community.

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:03:28] 

Why is it important for you to attend WordCamps or contribute to the WordPress project?

[Ricardas Kudirka 00:03:33] 

My name is Ricardas Kudirka.

Basically, for everyone who’s using WordPress, it’s really important to understand how big the community is that we have here. So the community is an important and crucial part of WordPress.

And for it to grow, you need to attend the WordCamps, you need to share knowledge, and you need to meet people. So networking here and while meeting the exciting people who are developing WordPress or who are contributing to it, who are providing the services, who enable people to use WordPress.

That’s a crucial point for everyone to attend.

[Kathy Drewien 00:04:05] 

It’s important to attend them because it’s very hard to describe them. We are not like any other thing you have ever done in your life. You have to be here to get it. And then once you get it, you wanna do more of it. It’s magical. It’s magical. There’s no way to get that experience without being here.

In terms of contributing, it’s a responsible thing to do. You want to give back instead of get, get, get. In the beginning, we’re all about the get, get, get. And then you go, oh my gosh. I didn’t know. I didn’t know I could do this. I didn’t know I had to write code. I can actually just stand around and talk to people and contribute to the project.

[Jen Miller 00:04:50] 

Well, it’s a community effort, and so if we want it to progress and grow, we need to put our own individual effort into the community.

Plus, we make friends, we make connections, and we find people who we can help and who can help us.

[Alex Stine 00:05:07]

I feel it is important to support the community that got me my start in technology and make sure that people understand that accessibility is very much a requirement.

You know, we need to make sure we keep the community inclusive for all.

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:05:21]

What is your favorite way to WordPress?

[Courtney Patubo Kranzke 00:05:24] 

I started with WordPress as a personal blogger. So it continues to be my favorite way to use WordPress. But, my use has evolved to using it for work as well as a place to share my photography and food blogging.

[Courtney Robertson 00:05:42] 

My favorite way to WordPress is through the Training team. Most of the things that I write these days are on make.wordpress.org/training and or learn.wordpress.org.

I love teaching people about WordPress, helping people at all skill levels advance, and that’s where you’ll find me around the WordPress Training team.

[Dustin  Hartzler 00:05:59] 

My favorite way to WordPress is just building cool things. Like I have a website, my wife has a couple of websites, and me just trying to learn things and trying to do them myself. Yesterday, there was a session, a 15-minute long session, and I learned how to customize the options available for different core WordPress blocks.

I didn’t realize that you could just make a button and like make a default like here’s the style for the default button. So every button’s exactly the same on the site. Like how cool is that? I like the side of customizing WordPress to make it easier for people who are non-techy like me to use my site, like my wife, and whatnot.

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:06:30] 

How do you use WordPress in your day-to-day life?

[Topher 00:06:32] 

It’s sort of a universal tool for me. I blog, and I do podcasts.

I enjoy drinking whiskey, so I built a rating system for it. And I use it as a notepad, a scratch pad. I use it as my photography backup system. Just kind of as a universal tool for everything

[Alex Stine 00:06:53]

So I currently am one of the Accessibility team reps.

I’m a core contributor, Guttenberg contributor, the occasional meta contributor, and the occasional training team contributor.

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:07:05]

Well, if that doesn’t convince you to go to a WordCamp or start your own meetup group, I just don’t know what will. Big thanks to everyone who sat down with us there in San Diego.

[Josepha Haden Chomphosy 00:07:23]

And now it’s time for our small list of big things.

First thing, WordPress Global Translation Day is coming up next week on September 28th. This is a great opportunity to learn more about the hard work that goes into translating all of this software for folks all around the world. If you want to learn more about how you could contribute to translations, I’ll have a link in the show notes for you.

The second thing is that WooSesh is coming up on October 11th through 13th, 2022. This one is not an in-person event. It’s a WPSessions event, but it specifically talks about how to get some eCommerce going on your WordPress site. So if you’ve been thinking about how to get a shop on your site, or just making your current shop a bit more complicated, then this is the event for you.

And the third thing on our list today is All Things Open. They are hosting a hybrid event this year from October 31st through November 2nd. This event isn’t specific to WordPress, but it is specific to open source and one of the best resources for learning some OSS basics. So if you’ve been interested in learning more about how this whole open source thing is an idea that will change our generation, then set your sights on that event. I will have a link in the show notes there as well.

And that, my friends, is your small list of big things. Thank you for tuning in today for the WordPress Briefing. I’m your host, Josepha Haden Chomphosy. And I’ll see you again in a couple of weeks.

Hot Off the Press: New WordPress.com Themes for September 2022

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 14-09-2022

The WordPress.com team is always working on new design ideas to bring your website to life. Below you’ll find the four newest themes that we’ve added to our library, giving you beautiful options for small businesses/organizations, artists, and even a fun retro throwback.

To install any of the below themes, click the the name of the theme you like, which brings you right to the installation page. Then simply click the “Activate this design” button. You can also click “Open live demo,” which brings up a clickable, scrollable version of the theme for you to preview.

Premium themes are free to use for any user on a Premium plan or above, or can be purchased individually by those with free sites or Personal plans.

You can explore all of our themes by navigating to the “Themes” page, which is found under “Appearance” in the left-side menu of your WordPress.com dashboard. Or, just click here:


Cultivate (Premium Theme)

Cultivate is a theme for the cause-driven individual, organization, or project. It was designed with community in mind and comes with useful patterns for earning memberships, taking donations, collecting emails, sharing news, and more.

Click here to view a demo of this theme.


Disco

Disco is a funky, vibrant, opinionated theme with a monospaced font. Both its styles and spacing form an edgy aesthetic perfect for those looking to build a quirky website.

Click here to view a demo of this theme.


Yuga (Premium Theme)

Yuga is a visually stunning theme meant for professionals and businesses who seek to showcase their work, team, and values.

Click here to view a demo of this theme.


Thriving Artist (Premium Theme)

Thriving Artist is a theme for creators who use the web to tell their stories, share their work, and connect with their fans. It leverages WooCommerce to give you the ability to integrate a simple (or extensive) store.

Don’t forget to grab your .art domain for more than 50% off while you’re at it!

Click here to view a demo of this theme.


Stay tuned for more updates about new themes, patterns, blocks, and other exciting product updates! And be sure to click below to take a look at the entire showcase of themes we offer:

Calling All Creators: Showcase Your Art with a Discounted .art Domain and a New Website Theme

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 12-09-2022

This month, we have an exciting announcement that should appeal to all creators, whether you use traditional artistic mediums or play around with new forms like digital, crypto, and VR art, or NFTs.

All new .art domain registrations are on sale through September 30, 2023. You can now secure a great domain name that reflects your artistic identity and secures your creative brand for just $6 USD for the first year, which is more than 50% off. 

We have also recently launched several brand new themes to showcase your art and give your site a fresh look. 

Your Website as a Creative Hub

As an artist, an important part of expressing yourself is being able to control the way your work and brand is presented online. Having your own site is a great way to create and sustain your brand, retain control over your content, and present it in the way you want it to be seen.  

While social media will always remain a great tool to reach your audience and get quick and direct feedback, your own website should serve as your creative hub. It should function as a sort of digital business card and can also be your online store.

.art Domains: A Strong Digital Identity for Creators

A custom domain name at WordPress.com offers you the opportunity to use your own name or any name that describes your artistic identity for your website’s address to build or enhance your online presence. Choosing .art defines you as an artist before anyone even visits your website. 

Having your own site with a domain name that reflects your artistic identity also means you don’t need to worry about aligning all your media platform profile names and handles since your site can serve as a one-stop shop with links to all of your social media profiles.

Choosing a Theme to Showcase Your Work

After you find a domain, you need a great website to show your work to the world. Check out some of our newest themes designed for artists, including Heiwa, Appleton, and Pendant.

Appleton theme for WordPress.com.

Heiwa is a great choice for a clean and elegant theme with sophisticated typography. If displaying a portfolio is what you’re looking for, check out Appleton. And last but not least, Pendant offers a dark background, large hero image, and serif headings to create a contemporary look.

Get Your .art Domain Today!

Head over to WordPress.com and get your .art domain today for just $6 USD for the first year: 

5 Ways to Become a “Pro” with Professional Email

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 09-09-2022

Small business professionals and owners spend a lot of time on email. Each email is an important piece of communication and could contribute to your business in many ways, like building relationships, selling your products, giving a great customer experience, building your brand, growing revenue, and much more. 

Speaking with Professional Email users, we’ve found 5 ways that help them to achieve their goals on a daily basis:

  1. Find if people read your message: If you’re sending an important email to someone, find out when they’ve opened it by setting up a read receipt. This also helps keep people accountable reading and replying to your email to move your business forward.
Read receipts in action
  1. Save time with email templates: Sending lots of emails can get quite tedious. No wonder email templates are one of the most used features. This helps you set up an effective template that you can tailor to the recipient and save on your precious time.
  2. Set up reminders and forget the rest: It’s easy to forget to reply to an email or follow up on an answered one. Our memory is already loaded with too many to-do list items so follow-up reminders help you make sure nothing slips through the cracks.
  3. Stamp with your signature: Maintaining a professional image is important for keeping your customers’ trust and appearing credible online. Signature builder helps you have that image every time you send the email and preloads all the information people need to reach out to you.
Signature image

  1. Create rules for your inbox: If you’re wearing many hats or working on multiple projects at once, staying organized is crucial for your success. Set custom rules with predefined conditions to automatically organize and filter your emails into folders. Simply create a rule, define the criteria for the rule, and your emails will be auto-sorted into the folders of your choice.

Are you ready to take your email experience to the next level? Try Professional Email free for 3 months and see how these features help you.

SSH Now Available for Business and eCommerce Sites

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 07-09-2022

Are you a WordPress.com power user? For ultimate security, you can now enable SSH and access your Business or eCommerce-powered WordPress.com site from the command line. Use WP-CLI to install and activate a series of plugins, manage users, or handle search-and-replace functions across your site.

Enable SSH on WordPress.com

To enable SSH on your WordPress.com site, you’ll need to have an active Business or eCommerce plan.

Head to My Site > Settings > Hosting Configuration to enable SSH access on your site under SFTP/SSH Credentials. You may need to activate hosting access to create SFTP credentials. Once you’ve generated an SFTP user and password, you can toggle on SSH access for your site.

With SSH, you have the power of the command line at your fingertips. You can:

  • Manage your site’s users and content using WP-CLI commands
  • Import and export your site’s content
  • Connect your favorite IDE over SSH
  • Automate repetitive tasks using simple scripts
  • Troubleshoot errors using the PHP error log
  • And more!

Detailed instructions are available on how to enable SSH for your Business and eCommerce WordPress.com websites.

Use WP-CLI on WordPress.com

WP-CLI is WordPress’ command line interface. Once you SSH into your WordPress.com site, the included commands let you install plugins, add users, or run a search-and-replace against the database. If you are comfortable writing PHP, you can even create your own custom commands for special operations.

For example, the command to delete a comment is `wp comment delete`. Deleting a comment using WP-CLI can look like this:


$ wp comment delete 1337 --force
Success: Deleted comment 1337.

Similarly, `wp export` is a command to export your site’s content to a WXR file. Exporting your site content at the command line might look like this:


$ wp export
Starting export process...
Writing to file /tmp/staging.wordpress.2016-05-24.000.xml
Success: All done with export.

Ready to dive in? Check out our support documentation about how to use WP-CLI on WordPress.com.

Build Your Next Site on WordPress.com

SSH access is one of a series of new tools we’re releasing for those building sites on WordPress.com. Our goal is to make WordPress.com an enjoyable, indispensable part of your workflow.

What else would you like to see in your terminal? How could we make WordPress.com an even more powerful place to build a website? Feel free to leave a comment, or submit your ideas using our short feature request form.


Dropping security updates for WordPress versions 3.7 through 4.0

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 07-09-2022

As of December 1, 2022 the WordPress Security Team will no longer provide security updates for WordPress versions 3.7 through 4.0.

These versions of WordPress were first released eight or more years ago so the vast majority of WordPress installations run a more recent version of WordPress. The chances this will affect your site, or sites, is very small.

If you are unsure if you are running an up-to-date version of WordPress, please log in to your site’s dashboard. Out of date versions of WordPress will display a notice that looks like this:

WordPress update notice: "WordPress 6.0.2 is available! Pleaes update now."

In WordPress versions 3.8 – 4.0, the version you are running is displayed in the bottom of the “At a Glance” section of the dashboard. In WordPress 3.7 this section is titled “Right Now”.

"At a Glance" section of the WordPress dashboard. The final line includes the exact version of WordPress the site is running.

The Make WordPress Security blog has further details about the process to end support.

The Month in WordPress – August 2022

Posted by download | Posted in Software | Posted on 05-09-2022

August has been a busy month, with the redesign of WordPress.org, new localized content on Learn WordPress, and the WordPress 6.0.2 security and maintenance release. But that’s not all! Read on to catch up on the latest WordPress news.


WordPress 6.1 walk-through scheduled for September 13, 2022

Save the date! A live interactive walk-through of WordPress 6.1 is coming up on September 13, 2022, at 16:00 UTC. The event will take place via Zoom and include a discussion of new major features, resolved tickets, and potential blockers.

Attendance is open to anyone who wants to know more about what’s coming in the next major release. If you are unable to attend, the event will be recorded for on-demand viewing.

Learn more about the WordPress 6.1 product walk-through.

The WordPress.org Homepage and Download page got a new jazz-inspired look

The redesign of the WordPress.org homepage and download page went live on August 15, 2022. The new pages highlight the benefits of using WordPress while making it easy to access resources for getting started. The look and feel build on the jazzy aesthetic that WordPress is known for.

WordPress.org homepage

In addition, the admin bar and global navigation menu have been updated to simplify and better organize the content across the WordPress.org network. Expect more design updates and iterations as efforts to refresh the website continue.

Check out the new WordPress.org homepage and download page.

Gutenberg versions 13.9 and 14.0 are here

Two new versions of Gutenberg were released last month:

  • Gutenberg 13.9 became available for download on August 17, 2022. This release continues to iterate and polish the user interface (UI), interaction, and engine work for site editing.
  • Gutenberg 14.0 brings a lot of enhancements, including extra block supports in the UI, a revamped List block, and more. It shipped on August 31, 2022.

This new post in the “Core Editor Improvement” series focuses on the template creation enhancements coming in WordPress 6.1. You can explore them now with the Gutengerg plugin.

New localized content on Learn WordPress

Learn WordPress is currently expanding the non-English resources available on the platform! Last month, some members of the Training Team hosted the first free online workshops in Japanese. Following its success, two more sessions will be held on September 7 and 17, 2022. Get the details in the online workshop calendar.

In addition, learners have access to:

Curious about what else is new on Learn WordPress? Check out the learning materials released in August 2022.

Enter the educational world of the Training Team and its Learn initiative in the latest episode of WP Briefing.

Team updates: WordPress 6.0.2 maintenance release, Twenty Twenty-Three kickoff, and more

The Testing Team is looking for facilitators to expand testing efforts across the project.

Feedback & testing requests

Gutenberg 13.8 introduced the first version of fluid typography, a new feature that allows theme authors to define text size that can scale and adapt to changes in screen size. Help shape its future by joining this testing call.

Event updates & WordCamps

The Call for Speakers for WordCamp Asia is closing soon! Submit your application by September 30, 2022, and help reach WCAsia’s speaker diversity goals.


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The following folks contributed to this edition of The Month in WordPress: @laurlittle, @mysweetcate, @chaion07, @bsanevans, @priethor, @rmartinezduque, @webcommsat.